Latest Videos

Meet Leila Ali Elmi, the first-ever...
With the rising uncertainty over the status of migrants in many European countries, the election of Somali-born woman as a member of parliament in Sweden is a welcome reprieve for many Somali immigrants in the country.
Leila Ali Elmi has made history as the first Somali and East African woman to be voted into the Riksdag, as the Swedish parliament is known. Running on a Green Party ticket, she will represent the Angered District in Gothenburg. It will not be her first time representing her people as she was a member of the Angered district council since 2014.
More about this
Photo: Hiiraan Online
Elmi, who left Somalia in the 1990s, has been living in Sweden’s second largest city, where more than 14,000 Somalis also reside.  Her home district is considered to have one of the highest employment rates and has been constantly referred to as “deprived and isolated.”
Among the things on her priorities is education.
“I come from a suburb and grew up in a suburb, the issue that matters to me is school policy, in the socioeconomically deprived areas it’s pretty bad schools, we have to focus on the school and that’s the question I especially when I enter the Riksdag,” she said.
According to reports, many people considered Elmi an underdog and even referred to her as ‘hidden’ because she was not a popular candidate. Her campaign worked as she connected more with people at the grassroots level.
Elmi now joins the long list of Somali-born political leaders that includes America’s Ilhan Omar, who is hoping to represent Minnesota in the Congress.Illhan Omar…Knight Errant
Omar defeated Rep. Keith Ellison in Minnesota’s fifth congressional district. She also made history as the first Somali legislator in the United States in 2016.
Somali-born Magid Magid also made history for becoming the youngest person to become the mayor of Sheffield. and just like Elmi, he had served as a councillor and later served as deputy mayor before his election.Photo: YouTube
Somalia is Becoming a Pawn in a UAE-...

© Provided by Albawaba.com
Somalia President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmajo in Abu Dhabi, April 2017 | Somali Embassy UAE
By Eleanor BeevorIt’s been a breathless few weeks for the Horn of Africa in general, and for Somalia in particular. A historic agreement was signed between Somalia, Eritrea and Ethiopia to end all hostilities between them. Straight afterwards, Eritrea reconciled with Djibouti. For the first time in decades, it seems that the regional capitals are sincerely ready to make peace, and to build on it. But though this is no doubt good news, it will not solve Somalia’s internal strife. This week, Somalia’s future is looking extremely uncertain. And that is – at least partly - because it has become embroiled in the Gulf crisis that has pitted Qatar against its neighbours.Somalia is meant to be getting ready to take charge of its own security. The African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) was coined as a “peace support” mission in 2007, to help Somali forces oust the Al-Qaeda linked Al Shabaab insurgent group from the capital Mogadishu. But its six-month mandate kept being expanded, and a decade later it is still there. It is now comprised of over 21,000 troops from six contributing African nations.Whilst it has been indispensable in pushing back Al Shabaab and in providing some fragile security, it can’t by any standards be thought of as a “support” mission anymore. AMISOM effectively replaced the Somali National Army (SNA) in combatting Al Shabaab. But now, it is talking about winding back its presence in the country.AMISOM wants to withdraw a thousand troops by February 2019, and aims to be handing back all security responsibilities to the SNA and leaving Somalia by 2020 to 2021.There are no guarantees that this will go ahead as planned. Abdullahi Boru, a Somalia analyst, told Al Bawaba:“While Amisom has indicated its withdrawal, the situation in the Horn of Africa has seen sea change over the last few months, that, that decision could be reversed. I am not suggesting anything has been agreed as of yet, but having Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea (which has been accused of supporting Al Shabaab) on side will have a significant impact on the security situation on the ground. At the practical level, withdrawal of troops when the security situation on the ground has not changed will increase the number of attacks by Al Shabaab, and other opportunistic criminal outfits.”// But however AMISOM’s departure eventually pans out, the SNA is still a very long way from ready to assume its duties. The army has been provided with training by a number of countries - including the US, the UK, Turkey, Sudan and Egypt. But each of these militaries has differences, from how to salute to different chains of command. Reassembling the SNA into a coherent unit after it has been trained in myriad different ways will be an uphill struggle.Add to that the fact that the SNA is chronically low on resources. Somali security forces are short of everything from radios to paper and pencils. Their access to weapons is ad hoc, and corruption is rife. How things will look when the SNA assumes control from AMISOM is anybody’s guess, but it’s safe to say that it won’t be easy for them to hold the existing gains made against Al Shabaab.But a bigger security problem could be on the horizon, and it ironically comes from within Somalia’s own government system. In the past few days, five of the country’s federal states, including the semi-autonomous region of Puntland, have severed ties with the Federal Government of President Mohammed Abdullahi Farmaajo. The leaders of the states in question say that the move is to put pressure on the government, and push it to meet its goals.Farmaajo’s government is aiming for the country to have its first election with universal suffrage - “One Person, One Vote” - since the decades-long Siad Barre dictatorship. So far, the security situation has rendered this impossible. Farmaajo’s government was elected by a complex system of selection by clan leaders, as a preliminary move towards universal elections. There are a lot of doubts about whether this will be possible within the next two years. But if the government fails, it will be a major blow to its credibility.The problem is that the Somali federal system, and the country’s complex colonial history, means that there is only so much will for unity anyway. States regularly pursue their own agendas, and greater autonomy. And while there are plenty of legitimate grievances to be had with Mogadishu, it’s the country’s inconsistent relationships with the Gulf states that is cleaving the deepest divisions in Somalia right now.Up until last April, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates were some of the Farmaajo government’s closest international partners. The UAE was Somalia’s largest trading partner, and Saudi Arabia bought the majority of the livestock that Somalia exports.However, when these two countries led the blockade of Qatar in 2017, they pushed for all countries in the region to sever ties with Doha. But unlike many countries which kept quiet and maintained their links to Doha anyway, Farmaajo seemed to feel the need to openly declare Somalia’s neutrality in the Gulf crisis. (That may have been a gesture of quasi-solidarity with Turkey, which is Somalia’s largest foreign investor).The scene of the horrific October 2017 bombing by Al Shabaab in Mogadishu (AFP)This wasn’t good enough for the blockading states, and relations began to sour. Tensions between Farmaajo’s government and the UAE were already rising due to the latter’s relentless, and divisive port building campaign around the Horn of Africa. The UAE is upsetting Mogadishu by developing its own ports in Somali regions that are striving for autonomy from Somalia. One in Berbera, Somaliland, a self-declared independent state, and the other at Bosaso, in the semi-autonomous region of Puntland.The Federal Government sees this as undermining its authority vis-a-vis the state authorities. And they wouldn’t be wrong to do so – the UAE unsurprisingly likes to deal with state rather than central authorities, which give it a freer hand to pursue its interests.But things came to a head in April this year when an Emirati plane stuffed with $10 million in cash was found on a Mogadishu runway. Whilst the UAE insisted this was for the salaries of the soldiers it was training, the Federal Government didn’t buy it, and assumed the money was for influencing state politicians. The UAE pulled out its training support for the SNA in response, and its relations with Mogadishu are on ice. But Qatar has seemingly rushed in to fill the vacuum the UAE left.Farmaajo was courted with a state visit to Doha a month later, on which Qatar pledged hundreds of millions of dollars worth of aid to Somalia. And there is reason to believe Qatar’s influence is even further reaching. In recent weeks, the Somali intelligence agency NISA sacked a former deputy director for revealing that Al Shabaab had infiltrated the agency. His replacement is the former Al Jazeera bureau chief for Somalia, who is widely suspected to be pushing Qatari interests in his new position.To whatever extent this is true, the suspicion alone is a troubling development for Somali security. One of the key drivers of the current fallout between the striking states and Farmaajo’s Federal Government is disagreement over UAE relations, since federal states have a lot to gain or lose depending on their relationship with it. This is particularly true for the semi-autonomous regions, who are looking to leverage the Gulf conflict for their own interests. Abdullahi Boru added:“Somaliland and Puntland have been vying for control of the Sool and Sanaag regions because of their strategic link to the Gulf of Aden to the Ethiopian border. The increase of interest from the Gulf Countries post their fall out, has embolden the devolved authorities.”Equally, the UAE is proving itself adept at circumventing Mogadishu’s rule by dealing directly with state authorities. If Qatar is suspected of having too much influence in the Federal Government, the UAE will play states off against it, and vice versa. But this could come at a very significant security cost as AMISOM works to extract itself from Somalia.// The SNA is already fractured. But the army cannot operate effectively across a nation if individual states will not cooperate with the central government. And this is a weakness that Al Shabaab, an insurgency with deep roots in the Somali population, and with a history of innovatively undermining the government, will be sure to exploit.
After 15 years of elephants, Somalia...
A very popular bullion coin, the Somali Elephant is now in its fifteenth year. While it has displayed a pretty good variety of designs over the years, it must get harder and harder to come up with something new, so the producer has decided to add a second subject to the mix. This should run alongside the elephant, but for how long we don’t yet know.The subject chosen is an apex predator and one of the most beautiful animals in nature – the Leopard. The coin looks okay. It isn’t a particularly dynamic design, but here’s hoping it builds into a nice varied selection as the years go by. Available as a 1oz silver with a 30,000 mintage, or as a 1oz gold with a 1,000 mintage, this is a bit rarer than the norm, especially given the ever increasing numbers of elephants. Available to order from APMEX right now, availability should spread over the next few datys.
REVERSE: Features a full image of a leopard looking back over his left shoulder. In the background is a natural setting of a rocky landscape.
OBVERSE: Displays the Somalian Coat of Arms and the date along with the face value.
Somali FM receives EU Chargé d’Affaires

MOGADISHU – Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Federal Republic of Somalia, H.E. Amb. Ahmed Isse Awad received  the charge d’affaires of the European Union Delegation to Somalia, Mr. Fulgencio Garrido Ruiz.
Both sides discussed on issues of mutual concern, including international and regional developments.
The European Union is one of the main donors to improve the security situation in Somalia through AMISOM forces as well as training the Somali security forces to strengthen the stability and development of the country recovering from the scourge of civil wars and armed violence.
Third Girl Dies in Somalia After...

A 10-year-old girl has died in Somalia due to complications from female genital mutilation (FGM).
Mumtaz Qorane was the third child to die in the country this week after undergoing the practice, which is also known as female circumcision.
Dr. Mohamed Hussein Aden tells VOA's Somali service that the girl underwent the procedure three days ago in the countryside near the town of Goldogob, and contracted tetanus afterward.
He said a medical team sent to bring her to a hospital in the town of Galkayo was told Monday morning that the girl had died.
Aden received an emergency call about the girl’s grave condition on Sunday while talking to VOA Somali about the death of two sisters, Asiya Farah Abdi Warsame and Khadija Farah Abdi Warsame, who bled to death following FGM.
Doctors and activists said the girls died in Bur Salah village about 75 kilometers west of Galkayo, but the mutilation took place about a week ago near Galladi, across the border in the Somali region of Ethiopia.
Galkayo hospital is the main health facility used by nomads who live along the border areas between Somalia and Ethiopia.
Dr. Mohamed Hussein Aden said the two girls who died in Bur Salah were aged 10 and 11, adding, "There is no other way to describe it, it's brutal."
Activists are demanding an end to female circumcision, calling it a dangerous ritual with no practical benefits.
The practice involves removing part or all of the clitoris and labia for non-medical reasons. The World Health Organization (WHO) says cutting, often performed on girls 15 and younger, can result in bleeding, infection, problems with urination and complications with childbearing.
Somalia under renewed scrutiny over FGM...
Women's rights and gender equality
Global development
Somalia under renewed scrutiny over FGM after two more young girls die
Death of sisters aged 10 and 11 undermines hopes of change inspired by announcement of landmark prosecution

Two more girls in Somalia have died after undergoing female genital mutilation, just weeks after a high-profile case prompted the attorney general to announce the first prosecution against the practice in the country’s history.
Two sisters, aged 10 and 11, bled to death last week after they were cut in the remote pastoral village of Arawda North in Galdogob district, Puntland, said activist Hawa Aden Mohamed of the Galkayo Centre.
The deaths of Aasiyo and Khadijo Farah Abdi Warsame have come at a time of transition in Somalia, where 98% of all women and girls undergo FGM, the highest rate in the world. Most cases go unreported.
The case of Deeqa Dahir Nuur, 10, who haemorrhaged to death in July after she was operated on by a traditional cutter, prompted Somalia’s attorney general Ahmed Ali Dahir to send a team of investigators to her remote village with the aim of prosecuting those involved in her death.
The move was heralded at the time as a “defining moment for Somalia” by Mahdi Mohammed Gulaid, the deputy prime minister, , who said: “It is not acceptable that in the 21st century FGM is continuing in Somalia. It should not be part of our culture. It is definitely not part of the Islamic religion.”
However, activists in the country say the death of the two sisters proves that the government is not moving quickly enough to prevent further incidents.
“It is shocking that, with the massive publicity of the Deeqa case and subsequent commitment by the Somali government to do more, on the ground change does not yet seem to be happening,” said Brendan Wynne of Donor Direct Action, an international women’s group that runs a fund to end FGM. “Girls continue to die from this devastating abuse while we wait for politicians to move.”
FGM is technically illegal in Puntland, a semi-autonomous state in north-eastern Somalia, where lawmakers recently approved legislation outlawing the practice.
“Yet there seems to be reluctance in discussing and passing the anti-FGM law in Puntland, which was recently approved by the cabinet,” said Mohamed.
“We hope that this will serve as a wake-up call for those responsible to see the need to have the law in place to protect girls from this heinous practice.”
Most girls in Somalia undergo the most severe form of circumcision – during which external genitalia are removed or repositioned and the vaginal opening is sewn up, leaving only a small hole through which to pass menstrual blood – between the ages of five and nine. The operation is often performed by untrained midwives or healers using knives, razors or broken glass.
The two girls underwent the surgery on 10 September but bled continuously for 24 hours, said Mohamed. Their mother tried to take them to nearby Bursallah town to seek medical help but the girls died during the journey, according to Mohamed.
Somali-born FGM survivor and campaigner Ifrah Ahmed said the sisters’ deaths were “very upsetting” given Puntland’s professed interest in outlawing the practice.
“I’m still in shock after Deeqa’s death and hearing this [news] is very upsetting, very sad, losing two little girls again to female genital mutilation,” said Ahmed.
“Puntland has approved the anti-FGM bill and still young girls are losing their lives. Immediate action needs to be taken by international donors who support Somalia, and by the federal government of Somalia [itself].”
Dhulka Hooyo Project: Celebrating...
Sara Jabril started the “ Dhulka Hooyo Project “ after stumbling upon an old family photo album.This online photography project unveils the beauty and rich cultural heritage of Somalia in the 1980s, before the civil war.*
All photos were taken by Sabine, Sara’s mother.Born in West Germany, she met her future husband in the early 80’s and in 1985, she hopped on a plane to Mogadishu, a city she barely knew! With her camera in hand, she documented their stay and road trips across the beautiful country.
In Somali language, one could translate “Dhulka Hooyo” by homeland or motherland. A quite befitting title as Somalia was home to all the people forced to leave the country because of the civil war that broke out.
The “ Dhulka Hooyo Project “ is also a tribute to the resilience of the Somali people, and a source of inspiration for its youth dispersed throughout the diaspora.
@Nigeriasinsight
Somali PM rejects foreign mediation in...
By ABDULKADIR KHALIFMore by this Author
Somali Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khayre has said that his government would not accept foreign mediation between the member states and the federal government.Mr Khayre was reacting to suggestions from the leaders of the federal states that a third party be invited to any talks between them and the Mogadishu-based Somali government.The Premier made the declaration on Sunday at a ceremony held in Mogadishu to re-launch a self-help programme called Isxilqaan.The leaders of the five member states of the federal government, namely Puntland, Jubaland, Southwest, Hirshabelle and Galmudug on September 8 issued a communiqué withdrawing cooperation with the central government.Natural resourcesThe communiqué followed a conference held in Kismayu, 500km south of Mogadishu.
The regional leaders expressed grievances on insecurity, the sharing of natural resources and the interference by the central government in the affairs of the member states, which they want addressed before resumption of cooperation.Mr Khayre, however, asserted that the days of Somali leaders seeking foreign mediation on internal issues were over. He reiterated that all differences should be sorted out through compromises.“We welcome that all grievances are cleared through dialogue and compromises, considering the interest of the Somali people,” said Mr Khayre.He particularly noted that Mogadishu could host a meeting of the Somali leaders, indirectly rejecting the suggestion that the capital was insecure.Our sovereignty“We cannot accept people saying that Mogadishu’s security was unreliable,” Mr Khayre stressed.“This is the Somali capital. A city in which we have all invested and stands as a symbol of our sovereignty,” he added.Presidents Ahmed Mohamed Islam Madobe of Jubbaland, Mohamed Abdi Ware of Hirshabelle, Abdiweli Mohamed Ali Gaas of Puntland, Sharif Hassan Sheikh Aden of Southwest and Ahmed Duale Gelle Haaf of Galmudug had not responded to call by their Somalia counterpart Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajo to attend a national security council meeting in Mogadishu on Monday.President Farmajo is the chair of the national security council that include the presidents of the members states and the Governor of Banadir region (Mogadishu and surrounding areas).The failure of the regional leaders to attend the meeting would be assumed to be directly related to the suspension of cooperation with the central government announced in Kismayu on September 8.
Related Stories
Somalia: Somali Parliament Holds Debate...
The Members of Somalia's Lower House chamber of Federal parliament held a debate on the Security issues during today's sitting which came days after a car bomb injured MP.The Security forces were stationed near the Parliament and on Sayidka street and other Roads leading to the House early in the morning.
The MPs debated on the security of the capital amid several insecurity incidents that took place in the city shuttered months of peace.
Barely two days ago, a member of parliament, Mohamed Mursal Barrow has narrowly survived death after an IED fitted into his vehicle went off outside the national theatre in the capital.
Al Shabaab has claimed the responsibility for the attack on the MP and vowed to continue its explosions in the city amid tight security and heavy presence of police on main junctions.
Somalia: Regional Leaders Boycott...
situation reportSep 17, 2018 | 16:37 GMT1 min readWhat Happened: Somali Prime Minister Hassan Khaire has rejected calls for international assistance after the country's regional leaders chose to boycott a National Security Council meeting scheduled for Sept. 17 and 18, Goobjoog News reported.Why It Matters: Somali authorities designed the National Security Council to become the principal mechanism for security coordination between the country's federal and regional governments. Without it, Somalia will struggle to create a national army capable of combatting militancy and taking over from the U.N.-backed peacekeeping force, the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).Background: Somalia's member states broke ties with the federal government on Sept. 8, plunging the country into a political crisis. The country has struggled with civil war for decades, and AMISOM has been active there since 2007. Read More:Connected ContentRegions & CountriesCopyright © Stratfor Enterprises, LLC. All rights reserved.
EXCLUSIVE: Former Wa All Stars coach...
Alhaji Mumuni Sokpari has been appointed coach of Somali top flight side Elman FC, GHANAsoccernet.com can exclusively report.
Sokpari touched down in the capital city of the Northern African country, Mogadishu over the weekend ahead of his imminent signing.
The soft-spoken gaffer has been out of work since he was sacked by former Ghana Premier League champions Wa All Stars six months ago, after failing to extricate the side's disappointing campaign.
Sokpari was with the Northern Blues for close to a decade.
Third Girl Dies in Somalia After...
Harun MarufMonday September 17, 2018
A 10-year-old girl has died in Somalia due to complications from female genital mutilation (FGM).
Mumtaz Qorane was the third child to die in the country this week after undergoing the practice, which is also known as female circumcision.
Dr. Mohamed Hussein Aden tells VOA's Somali service that the girl underwent the procedure three days ago in the countryside near the town of Goldogob, and contracted tetanus afterward.
He said a medical team sent to bring her to a hospital in the town of Galkayo was told Monday morning that the girl had died.
Aden received an emergency call about the girl’s grave condition on Sunday while talking to VOA Somali about the death of two sisters, Asiya Farah Abdi Warsame and Khadija Farah Abdi Warsame, who bled to death following FGM.
Ads By Google Doctors and activists said the girls died in Bur Salah village about 75 kilometers west of Galkayo, but the mutilation took place about a week ago near Galladi, across the border in the Somali region of Ethiopia.
Galkayo hospital is the main health facility used by nomads who live along the border areas between Somalia and Ethiopia.
Dr. Mohamed Hussein Aden said the two girls who died in Bur Salah were aged 10 and 11, adding, "There is no other way to describe it, it's brutal."
Activists are demanding an end to female circumcision, calling it a dangerous ritual with no practical benefits.
The practice involves removing part or all of the clitoris and labia for non-medical reasons. The World Health Organization (WHO) says cutting, often performed on girls 15 and younger, can result in bleeding, infection, problems with urination and complications with childbearing.
advertisements
 
Somali PM rejects foreign mediation in internal affairs - East African
IGAD endorses Somalia and Djibouti to deploy troops to S. Sudan - The East African
Analog Africa digs into retro Somali funk group Dur-Dur Band's deep cuts - Pop Matters
Dhulka Hooyo Project: Celebrating Somalia before the war - africaNews
National Security Council meeting delayed after boycott by regional leaders - HOL
PM Kheire launches 'Is-xilqaan' program in Mogadishu. - HOL
Djibouti denies accusations of arms trafficking - Prensa Latina
Even after deaths, female genital mutilation still common in Somalia - VOA
Eng. Yarisow - Somali regional leaders should work with President Farmajo - HOL
Adelaide student guilty of being a member of ISIS - 9News.com
Federal DHS grants on extremism concern Muslims in Michigan - Detroit Free Press
Somali MP fighting for life after car bomb attack - The East African
AMISOM to use modern technology in securing gains made in Somalia - KPR
Deadly ethnic-based attacks erupt near Ethiopia's capital - AP
Camp David Accords turn 40: How Israel and Egypt found peace - dw
U.A.E. to Offer Expats Long-Term Residency Visa After Retirement - Bloomberg
Brazil police seize $16m from Equatorial Guinea's VP delegation - The Guardian
Efforts underway to free 18 Iranian fishermen kidnapped by Somalis - Tehran Times
A New World Marathon Record Almost Defies Description - The Atlantic
Garissa urged to boost security after attack - The Star
ONLF to Seek Self-Determination Vote - Bloomberg
Somalia is Becoming a Pawn in a UAE-...
© Provided by Albawaba.com
Somalia President Mohamed Abdullahi Mohamed Farmajo in Abu Dhabi, April 2017 | Somali Embassy UAEBy Eleanor BeevorIt’s been a breathless few weeks for the Horn of Africa in general, and for Somalia in particular. A historic agreement was signed between Somalia, Eritrea and Ethiopia to end all hostilities between them. Straight afterwards, Eritrea reconciled with Djibouti. For the first time in decades, it seems that the regional capitals are sincerely ready to make peace, and to build on it. But though this is no doubt good news, it will not solve Somalia’s internal strife. This week, Somalia’s future is looking extremely uncertain. And that is – at least partly - because it has become embroiled in the Gulf crisis that has pitted Qatar against its neighbours.Somalia is meant to be getting ready to take charge of its own security. The African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) was coined as a “peace support” mission in 2007, to help Somali forces oust the Al-Qaeda linked Al Shabaab insurgent group from the capital Mogadishu. But its six-month mandate kept being expanded, and a decade later it is still there. It is now comprised of over 21,000 troops from six contributing African nations.Whilst it has been indispensable in pushing back Al Shabaab and in providing some fragile security, it can’t by any standards be thought of as a “support” mission anymore. AMISOM effectively replaced the Somali National Army (SNA) in combatting Al Shabaab. But now, it is talking about winding back its presence in the country.AMISOM wants to withdraw a thousand troops by February 2019, and aims to be handing back all security responsibilities to the SNA and leaving Somalia by 2020 to 2021.
There are no guarantees that this will go ahead as planned. Abdullahi Boru, a Somalia analyst, told Al Bawaba:“While Amisom has indicated its withdrawal, the situation in the Horn of Africa has seen sea change over the last few months, that, that decision could be reversed. I am not suggesting anything has been agreed as of yet, but having Ethiopia, Somalia and Eritrea (which has been accused of supporting Al Shabaab) on side will have a significant impact on the security situation on the ground. At the practical level, withdrawal of troops when the security situation on the ground has not changed will increase the number of attacks by Al Shabaab, and other opportunistic criminal outfits.”// But however AMISOM’s departure eventually pans out, the SNA is still a very long way from ready to assume its duties. The army has been provided with training by a number of countries - including the US, the UK, Turkey, Sudan and Egypt. But each of these militaries has differences, from how to salute to different chains of command. Reassembling the SNA into a coherent unit after it has been trained in myriad different ways will be an uphill struggle.Add to that the fact that the SNA is chronically low on resources. Somali security forces are short of everything from radios to paper and pencils. Their access to weapons is ad hoc, and corruption is rife. How things will look when the SNA assumes control from AMISOM is anybody’s guess, but it’s safe to say that it won’t be easy for them to hold the existing gains made against Al Shabaab.But a bigger security problem could be on the horizon, and it ironically comes from within Somalia’s own government system. In the past few days, five of the country’s federal states, including the semi-autonomous region of Puntland, have severed ties with the Federal Government of President Mohammed Abdullahi Farmaajo. The leaders of the states in question say that the move is to put pressure on the government, and push it to meet its goals.Farmaajo’s government is aiming for the country to have its first election with universal suffrage - “One Person, One Vote” - since the decades-long Siad Barre dictatorship. So far, the security situation has rendered this impossible. Farmaajo’s government was elected by a complex system of selection by clan leaders, as a preliminary move towards universal elections. There are a lot of doubts about whether this will be possible within the next two years. But if the government fails, it will be a major blow to its credibility.The problem is that the Somali federal system, and the country’s complex colonial history, means that there is only so much will for unity anyway. States regularly pursue their own agendas, and greater autonomy. And while there are plenty of legitimate grievances to be had with Mogadishu, it’s the country’s inconsistent relationships with the Gulf states that is cleaving the deepest divisions in Somalia right now.Up until last April, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates were some of the Farmaajo government’s closest international partners. The UAE was Somalia’s largest trading partner, and Saudi Arabia bought the majority of the livestock that Somalia exports.However, when these two countries led the blockade of Qatar in 2017, they pushed for all countries in the region to sever ties with Doha. But unlike many countries which kept quiet and maintained their links to Doha anyway, Farmaajo seemed to feel the need to openly declare Somalia’s neutrality in the Gulf crisis. (That may have been a gesture of quasi-solidarity with Turkey, which is Somalia’s largest foreign investor).The scene of the horrific October 2017 bombing by Al Shabaab in Mogadishu (AFP)This wasn’t good enough for the blockading states, and relations began to sour. Tensions between Farmaajo’s government and the UAE were already rising due to the latter’s relentless, and divisive port building campaign around the Horn of Africa. The UAE is upsetting Mogadishu by developing its own ports in Somali regions that are striving for autonomy from Somalia. One in Berbera, Somaliland, a self-declared independent state, and the other at Bosaso, in the semi-autonomous region of Puntland.The Federal Government sees this as undermining its authority vis-a-vis the state authorities. And they wouldn’t be wrong to do so – the UAE unsurprisingly likes to deal with state rather than central authorities, which give it a freer hand to pursue its interests.But things came to a head in April this year when an Emirati plane stuffed with $10 million in cash was found on a Mogadishu runway. Whilst the UAE insisted this was for the salaries of the soldiers it was training, the Federal Government didn’t buy it, and assumed the money was for influencing state politicians. The UAE pulled out its training support for the SNA in response, and its relations with Mogadishu are on ice. But Qatar has seemingly rushed in to fill the vacuum the UAE left.Farmaajo was courted with a state visit to Doha a month later, on which Qatar pledged hundreds of millions of dollars worth of aid to Somalia. And there is reason to believe Qatar’s influence is even further reaching. In recent weeks, the Somali intelligence agency NISA sacked a former deputy director for revealing that Al Shabaab had infiltrated the agency. His replacement is the former Al Jazeera bureau chief for Somalia, who is widely suspected to be pushing Qatari interests in his new position.To whatever extent this is true, the suspicion alone is a troubling development for Somali security. One of the key drivers of the current fallout between the striking states and Farmaajo’s Federal Government is disagreement over UAE relations, since federal states have a lot to gain or lose depending on their relationship with it. This is particularly true for the semi-autonomous regions, who are looking to leverage the Gulf conflict for their own interests. Abdullahi Boru added:“Somaliland and Puntland have been vying for control of the Sool and Sanaag regions because of their strategic link to the Gulf of Aden to the Ethiopian border. The increase of interest from the Gulf Countries post their fall out, has embolden the devolved authorities.”Equally, the UAE is proving itself adept at circumventing Mogadishu’s rule by dealing directly with state authorities. If Qatar is suspected of having too much influence in the Federal Government, the UAE will play states off against it, and vice versa. But this could come at a very significant security cost as AMISOM works to extract itself from Somalia.// The SNA is already fractured. But the army cannot operate effectively across a nation if individual states will not cooperate with the central government. And this is a weakness that Al Shabaab, an insurgency with deep roots in the Somali population, and with a history of innovatively undermining the government, will be sure to exploit.
NUSOJ and SIMHA JOINT Statement:...
[war kale ma leh]League of Arab States and all concerned international partners of Somalia. Subject: JOINT STATEMENT The National Union of Somali Journalists (NUSOJ), an independent national journalists trade ...
PM Khaire calls for rebuilding Somalia

Muqdisho – Somali Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khaire on Sunday night participated in an introductory ceremony of the Is-xilqaan program in Mogadishu.
Banadir region Governor, Ministers, MPs along with citizens came together for the Is-xilqaan program implementation ceremony.
PM Khaire emphasized to participants the importance of the Is-xilqaan program stating that it is an opportunity to rebuild the country, whilst providing a better future for the youth.
The Prime Minister encouraged Somali citizens to contribute monetarily, volunteer their time, to unite for taking part in achieving national interest.
Khaire stated “Citizens must come together to rebuild the country as a whole through the is-xilqaan program. All national leaders must do their part towards rebuilding our country.”
In August 2018, during the Garow meeting, the cabinet officially approved “Is-xilqaan” program which government and civilians will jointly rebuild roads, historical places and government institutional buildings.