Latest Videos

Meatpacker settles Somali prayer case
DENVER – A big U.S. meatpacker has agreed to pay $1.5 million to 138 Somali-American Muslim workers who were fired from their jobs at a Colorado plant after they were refused prayer breaks, a federal anti-discrimination agency said Friday.
Cargill Meat Solutions, a division of Minnesota-based agribusiness company Cargill Corp., also agreed to train managers and hourly workers in accommodating Muslim employees' prayer breaks at its Fort Morgan beef processing plant, the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission said.
Wichita, Kansas-based Cargill denies wrongdoing but agreed to settle to avoid further litigation, the federal agency said. The dispute dates back to the firings of the workers in late 2016 after management rescinded policies allowing Muslim employees to take short breaks for prayer.Walorski's full-time worker bill on hold
The U.S. House began a recess period Friday without taking a vote on the Save American Workers Act.
The bill, sponsored by Rep. Jackie Walorski, R-2nd, would change the definition of full-time employee under the Affordable Care Act's employer mandate to someone who works at least 40 hours a week on average. The mandate currently requires employers to provide health insurance to employees who work at least 30 hours a week on average.
Walorski's office said it expects the bill to be considered when the House returns to session in the last week of September.Typhoon threatens 5 million Filipinos
Typhoon Mangkhut slammed into the Philippines' northeastern coast early today, its ferocious wind and blinding rain ripping off tin roof sheets and knocking out power, and plowed through the agricultural region at the start of the onslaught.
The typhoon made landfall before dawn on the northern tip of Luzon Island, a breadbasket of flood-prone rice plains and mountain provinces often hit by landslides. More than 5 million people were at risk from the storm, which the Hawaii-based Joint Typhoon Warning Center downgraded from a super typhoon but still punching powerful winds and gusts equivalent to a Category 4 Atlantic hurricane.
Meet Leila Ali Elmi, the first-ever...
With the rising uncertainty over the status of migrants in many European countries, the election of Somali-born woman as a member of parliament in Sweden is a welcome reprieve for many Somali immigrants in the country.
Leila Ali Elmi has made history as the first Somali and East African woman to be voted into the Riksdag, as the Swedish parliament is known. Running on a Green Party ticket, she will represent the Angered District in Gothenburg. It will not be her first time representing her people as she was a member of the Angered district council since 2014.
More about this
Photo: Hiiraan Online
Elmi, who left Somalia in the 1990s, has been living in Sweden’s second largest city, where more than 14,000 Somalis also reside.  Her home district is considered to have one of the highest employment rates and has been constantly referred to as “deprived and isolated.”
Among the things on her priorities is education.
“I come from a suburb and grew up in a suburb, the issue that matters to me is school policy, in the socioeconomically deprived areas it’s pretty bad schools, we have to focus on the school and that’s the question I especially when I enter the Riksdag,” she said.
According to reports, many people considered Elmi an underdog and even referred to her as ‘hidden’ because she was not a popular candidate. Her campaign worked as she connected more with people at the grassroots level.
Elmi now joins the long list of Somali-born political leaders that includes America’s Ilhan Omar, who is hoping to represent Minnesota in the Congress.Illhan Omar…Knight Errant
Omar defeated Rep. Keith Ellison in Minnesota’s fifth congressional district. She also made history as the first Somali legislator in the United States in 2016.
Somali-born Magid Magid also made history for becoming the youngest person to become the mayor of Sheffield. and just like Elmi, he had served as a councillor and later served as deputy mayor before his election.Photo: YouTube
Airstrike kills two militants after US...
The United States conducted an airstrike in Somalia Tuesday after U.S. and partner troops came under attack. The incident occurred 37 miles west of Mogadishu, the country’s capital, in the central Somali village of Mubaraak. U.S. troops were participating in a “Somali partner forces-led operation against al­ Shabab, an al-Qaida-affiliated terrorist group,” according to a press release from U.S. Africa Command Thursday. The airstrike was conducted against an enemy fighting position after the joint patrol had already come under fire. AFRICOM reported that two al Shabab Islamist militants were killed in the strike, and one other militant was wounded. “We currently assess no civilians were injured or killed in this airstrike,” according to the AFRICOM release. “No U.S. personnel were injured or killed and all are accounted for following this operation.” #story_5346.lazy-wrapper{position:relative;height:0;overflow:hidden;padding-bottom:56.17977528089888%}#story_5346.lazy-wrapper img{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%} Senators consider putting AFRICOM headquarters, staff in Africa The 10-year-old combatant command has been based in Germany since its creation, a set up one senator called "disjointed." By: Leo Shane III However, one Somali partner force member was killed during the operation and two others were wounded in action. U.S. forces have increased their operations tempo in Somalia over the past year. The United States has carried out more than 20 airstrikes against al Shabab in Somalia in 2018. Special operations forces have also been rotating through the country for several years to bolster local and regional forces. American forces serve as front-line advisers to a United Nations-backed Somali government struggling against rebel factions across the country, particularly in rural southern areas. The U.S. military partners with the African Union Mission to Somalia, or AMISOM, during combined counter-terrorism operations against al Shabab training camps and terrorist leadership. #story_5346.lazy-wrapper{position:relative;height:0;overflow:hidden;padding-bottom:56.17977528089888%}#story_5346.lazy-wrapper img{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%} Report: AFRICOM looks to cut special ops missions, pull out hundreds of troops from Africa The plans, submitted by a top U.S. military commander, align with the Trump administration’s strategy to focus on near-peer threats from countries like China and Russia. By: Kyle Rempfer The African Union has a combined contribution of roughly 22,000 personnel in Somalia. By comparison, al Shabab has an estimated strength of 7,000 to 9,000 fighters, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. In early June, one U.S. soldier was killed and four more were wounded during an attack by al Shabab militants that consisted of small-arms fire and mortars. That attack occurred in southern Somalia’s Jubaland region. During that mission, the U.S. troops were working to “clear al-Shabab from contested areas, liberate villages from al-Shabab control, and establish a permanent combat outpost designed to increase the span of Federal Government of Somalia security and governance,” AFRICOM said in a statement after the soldier’s death. “U.S. forces will continue to use all authorized and appropriate measures to protect U.S. citizens and to disable terrorist threats," AFRICOM said in it’s latest statement. "This includes partnering with AMISOM and Somali National Security Forces in combined counterterrorism operations and targeting terrorists, their training camps, and their safe havens throughout Somalia and the region.” Al Shabab remains a serious threat for the Somali government, which has weak authority within the country and only regained control of Mogadishu in 2011. The group has been able to use Somalia as a haven from which they launch attacks on neighboring countries, such as Kenya and Uganda.
NUSOJ and SIMHA JOINT Statement:...
[war kale ma leh]League of Arab States and all concerned international partners of Somalia. Subject: JOINT STATEMENT The National Union of Somali Journalists (NUSOJ), an independent national journalists trade ...
Somali FM receives EU Chargé d’Affaires

MOGADISHU – Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation of the Federal Republic of Somalia, H.E. Amb. Ahmed Isse Awad received  the charge d’affaires of the European Union Delegation to Somalia, Mr. Fulgencio Garrido Ruiz.
Both sides discussed on issues of mutual concern, including international and regional developments.
The European Union is one of the main donors to improve the security situation in Somalia through AMISOM forces as well as training the Somali security forces to strengthen the stability and development of the country recovering from the scourge of civil wars and armed violence.
After 15 years of elephants, Somalia...
A very popular bullion coin, the Somali Elephant is now in its fifteenth year. While it has displayed a pretty good variety of designs over the years, it must get harder and harder to come up with something new, so the producer has decided to add a second subject to the mix. This should run alongside the elephant, but for how long we don’t yet know.The subject chosen is an apex predator and one of the most beautiful animals in nature – the Leopard. The coin looks okay. It isn’t a particularly dynamic design, but here’s hoping it builds into a nice varied selection as the years go by. Available as a 1oz silver with a 30,000 mintage, or as a 1oz gold with a 1,000 mintage, this is a bit rarer than the norm, especially given the ever increasing numbers of elephants. Available to order from APMEX right now, availability should spread over the next few datys.
REVERSE: Features a full image of a leopard looking back over his left shoulder. In the background is a natural setting of a rocky landscape.
OBVERSE: Displays the Somalian Coat of Arms and the date along with the face value.
Somalia under renewed scrutiny over FGM...
Women's rights and gender equality
Global development
Somalia under renewed scrutiny over FGM after two more young girls die
Death of sisters aged 10 and 11 undermines hopes of change inspired by announcement of landmark prosecution

Two more girls in Somalia have died after undergoing female genital mutilation, just weeks after a high-profile case prompted the attorney general to announce the first prosecution against the practice in the country’s history.
Two sisters, aged 10 and 11, bled to death last week after they were cut in the remote pastoral village of Arawda North in Galdogob district, Puntland, said activist Hawa Aden Mohamed of the Galkayo Centre.
The deaths of Aasiyo and Khadijo Farah Abdi Warsame have come at a time of transition in Somalia, where 98% of all women and girls undergo FGM, the highest rate in the world. Most cases go unreported.
The case of Deeqa Dahir Nuur, 10, who haemorrhaged to death in July after she was operated on by a traditional cutter, prompted Somalia’s attorney general Ahmed Ali Dahir to send a team of investigators to her remote village with the aim of prosecuting those involved in her death.
The move was heralded at the time as a “defining moment for Somalia” by Mahdi Mohammed Gulaid, the deputy prime minister, , who said: “It is not acceptable that in the 21st century FGM is continuing in Somalia. It should not be part of our culture. It is definitely not part of the Islamic religion.”
However, activists in the country say the death of the two sisters proves that the government is not moving quickly enough to prevent further incidents.
“It is shocking that, with the massive publicity of the Deeqa case and subsequent commitment by the Somali government to do more, on the ground change does not yet seem to be happening,” said Brendan Wynne of Donor Direct Action, an international women’s group that runs a fund to end FGM. “Girls continue to die from this devastating abuse while we wait for politicians to move.”
FGM is technically illegal in Puntland, a semi-autonomous state in north-eastern Somalia, where lawmakers recently approved legislation outlawing the practice.
“Yet there seems to be reluctance in discussing and passing the anti-FGM law in Puntland, which was recently approved by the cabinet,” said Mohamed.
“We hope that this will serve as a wake-up call for those responsible to see the need to have the law in place to protect girls from this heinous practice.”
Most girls in Somalia undergo the most severe form of circumcision – during which external genitalia are removed or repositioned and the vaginal opening is sewn up, leaving only a small hole through which to pass menstrual blood – between the ages of five and nine. The operation is often performed by untrained midwives or healers using knives, razors or broken glass.
The two girls underwent the surgery on 10 September but bled continuously for 24 hours, said Mohamed. Their mother tried to take them to nearby Bursallah town to seek medical help but the girls died during the journey, according to Mohamed.
Somali-born FGM survivor and campaigner Ifrah Ahmed said the sisters’ deaths were “very upsetting” given Puntland’s professed interest in outlawing the practice.
“I’m still in shock after Deeqa’s death and hearing this [news] is very upsetting, very sad, losing two little girls again to female genital mutilation,” said Ahmed.
“Puntland has approved the anti-FGM bill and still young girls are losing their lives. Immediate action needs to be taken by international donors who support Somalia, and by the federal government of Somalia [itself].”
Third Girl Dies in Somalia After...

A 10-year-old girl has died in Somalia due to complications from female genital mutilation (FGM).
Mumtaz Qorane was the third child to die in the country this week after undergoing the practice, which is also known as female circumcision.
Dr. Mohamed Hussein Aden tells VOA's Somali service that the girl underwent the procedure three days ago in the countryside near the town of Goldogob, and contracted tetanus afterward.
He said a medical team sent to bring her to a hospital in the town of Galkayo was told Monday morning that the girl had died.
Aden received an emergency call about the girl’s grave condition on Sunday while talking to VOA Somali about the death of two sisters, Asiya Farah Abdi Warsame and Khadija Farah Abdi Warsame, who bled to death following FGM.
Doctors and activists said the girls died in Bur Salah village about 75 kilometers west of Galkayo, but the mutilation took place about a week ago near Galladi, across the border in the Somali region of Ethiopia.
Galkayo hospital is the main health facility used by nomads who live along the border areas between Somalia and Ethiopia.
Dr. Mohamed Hussein Aden said the two girls who died in Bur Salah were aged 10 and 11, adding, "There is no other way to describe it, it's brutal."
Activists are demanding an end to female circumcision, calling it a dangerous ritual with no practical benefits.
The practice involves removing part or all of the clitoris and labia for non-medical reasons. The World Health Organization (WHO) says cutting, often performed on girls 15 and younger, can result in bleeding, infection, problems with urination and complications with childbearing.
Dhulka Hooyo Project: Celebrating...
Sara Jabril started the “ Dhulka Hooyo Project “ after stumbling upon an old family photo album.This online photography project unveils the beauty and rich cultural heritage of Somalia in the 1980s, before the civil war.*
All photos were taken by Sabine, Sara’s mother.Born in West Germany, she met her future husband in the early 80’s and in 1985, she hopped on a plane to Mogadishu, a city she barely knew! With her camera in hand, she documented their stay and road trips across the beautiful country.
In Somali language, one could translate “Dhulka Hooyo” by homeland or motherland. A quite befitting title as Somalia was home to all the people forced to leave the country because of the civil war that broke out.
The “ Dhulka Hooyo Project “ is also a tribute to the resilience of the Somali people, and a source of inspiration for its youth dispersed throughout the diaspora.
@Nigeriasinsight
PM Khaire calls for rebuilding Somalia

Muqdisho – Somali Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khaire on Sunday night participated in an introductory ceremony of the Is-xilqaan program in Mogadishu.
Banadir region Governor, Ministers, MPs along with citizens came together for the Is-xilqaan program implementation ceremony.
PM Khaire emphasized to participants the importance of the Is-xilqaan program stating that it is an opportunity to rebuild the country, whilst providing a better future for the youth.
The Prime Minister encouraged Somali citizens to contribute monetarily, volunteer their time, to unite for taking part in achieving national interest.
Khaire stated “Citizens must come together to rebuild the country as a whole through the is-xilqaan program. All national leaders must do their part towards rebuilding our country.”
In August 2018, during the Garow meeting, the cabinet officially approved “Is-xilqaan” program which government and civilians will jointly rebuild roads, historical places and government institutional buildings.
Somali PM rejects foreign mediation in...
By ABDULKADIR KHALIFMore by this Author
Somali Prime Minister Hassan Ali Khayre has said that his government would not accept foreign mediation between the member states and the federal government.Mr Khayre was reacting to suggestions from the leaders of the federal states that a third party be invited to any talks between them and the Mogadishu-based Somali government.The Premier made the declaration on Sunday at a ceremony held in Mogadishu to re-launch a self-help programme called Isxilqaan.The leaders of the five member states of the federal government, namely Puntland, Jubaland, Southwest, Hirshabelle and Galmudug on September 8 issued a communiqué withdrawing cooperation with the central government.Natural resourcesThe communiqué followed a conference held in Kismayu, 500km south of Mogadishu.
The regional leaders expressed grievances on insecurity, the sharing of natural resources and the interference by the central government in the affairs of the member states, which they want addressed before resumption of cooperation.Mr Khayre, however, asserted that the days of Somali leaders seeking foreign mediation on internal issues were over. He reiterated that all differences should be sorted out through compromises.“We welcome that all grievances are cleared through dialogue and compromises, considering the interest of the Somali people,” said Mr Khayre.He particularly noted that Mogadishu could host a meeting of the Somali leaders, indirectly rejecting the suggestion that the capital was insecure.Our sovereignty“We cannot accept people saying that Mogadishu’s security was unreliable,” Mr Khayre stressed.“This is the Somali capital. A city in which we have all invested and stands as a symbol of our sovereignty,” he added.Presidents Ahmed Mohamed Islam Madobe of Jubbaland, Mohamed Abdi Ware of Hirshabelle, Abdiweli Mohamed Ali Gaas of Puntland, Sharif Hassan Sheikh Aden of Southwest and Ahmed Duale Gelle Haaf of Galmudug had not responded to call by their Somalia counterpart Mohamed Abdullahi Farmajo to attend a national security council meeting in Mogadishu on Monday.President Farmajo is the chair of the national security council that include the presidents of the members states and the Governor of Banadir region (Mogadishu and surrounding areas).The failure of the regional leaders to attend the meeting would be assumed to be directly related to the suspension of cooperation with the central government announced in Kismayu on September 8.
Related Stories
Somalia: Somali Parliament Holds Debate...
The Members of Somalia's Lower House chamber of Federal parliament held a debate on the Security issues during today's sitting which came days after a car bomb injured MP.The Security forces were stationed near the Parliament and on Sayidka street and other Roads leading to the House early in the morning.
The MPs debated on the security of the capital amid several insecurity incidents that took place in the city shuttered months of peace.
Barely two days ago, a member of parliament, Mohamed Mursal Barrow has narrowly survived death after an IED fitted into his vehicle went off outside the national theatre in the capital.
Al Shabaab has claimed the responsibility for the attack on the MP and vowed to continue its explosions in the city amid tight security and heavy presence of police on main junctions.
Somalia: Regional Leaders Boycott...
situation reportSep 17, 2018 | 16:37 GMT1 min readWhat Happened: Somali Prime Minister Hassan Khaire has rejected calls for international assistance after the country's regional leaders chose to boycott a National Security Council meeting scheduled for Sept. 17 and 18, Goobjoog News reported.Why It Matters: Somali authorities designed the National Security Council to become the principal mechanism for security coordination between the country's federal and regional governments. Without it, Somalia will struggle to create a national army capable of combatting militancy and taking over from the U.N.-backed peacekeeping force, the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM).Background: Somalia's member states broke ties with the federal government on Sept. 8, plunging the country into a political crisis. The country has struggled with civil war for decades, and AMISOM has been active there since 2007. Read More:Connected ContentRegions & CountriesCopyright © Stratfor Enterprises, LLC. All rights reserved.
EXCLUSIVE: Former Wa All Stars coach...
Alhaji Mumuni Sokpari has been appointed coach of Somali top flight side Elman FC, GHANAsoccernet.com can exclusively report.
Sokpari touched down in the capital city of the Northern African country, Mogadishu over the weekend ahead of his imminent signing.
The soft-spoken gaffer has been out of work since he was sacked by former Ghana Premier League champions Wa All Stars six months ago, after failing to extricate the side's disappointing campaign.
Sokpari was with the Northern Blues for close to a decade.
Airstrike kills two militants after US...
The United States conducted an airstrike in Somalia Tuesday after U.S. and partner troops came under attack. The incident occurred 37 miles west of Mogadishu, the country’s capital, in the central Somali village of Mubaraak. U.S. troops were participating in a “Somali partner forces-led operation against al­ Shabab, an al-Qaida-affiliated terrorist group,” according to a press release from U.S. Africa Command Thursday. The airstrike was conducted against an enemy fighting position after the joint patrol had already come under fire. AFRICOM reported that two al Shabab Islamist militants were killed in the strike, and one other militant was wounded. “We currently assess no civilians were injured or killed in this airstrike,” according to the AFRICOM release. “No U.S. personnel were injured or killed and all are accounted for following this operation.” #story_5346.lazy-wrapper{position:relative;height:0;overflow:hidden;padding-bottom:56.17977528089888%}#story_5346.lazy-wrapper img{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%} Senators consider putting AFRICOM headquarters, staff in Africa The 10-year-old combatant command has been based in Germany since its creation, a set up one senator called "disjointed." By: Leo Shane III However, one Somali partner force member was killed during the operation and two others were wounded in action. U.S. forces have increased their operations tempo in Somalia over the past year. The United States has carried out more than 20 airstrikes against al Shabab in Somalia in 2018. Special operations forces have also been rotating through the country for several years to bolster local and regional forces. American forces serve as front-line advisers to a United Nations-backed Somali government struggling against rebel factions across the country, particularly in rural southern areas. The U.S. military partners with the African Union Mission to Somalia, or AMISOM, during combined counter-terrorism operations against al Shabab training camps and terrorist leadership. #story_5346.lazy-wrapper{position:relative;height:0;overflow:hidden;padding-bottom:56.17977528089888%}#story_5346.lazy-wrapper img{position:absolute;top:0;left:0;width:100%;height:100%} Report: AFRICOM looks to cut special ops missions, pull out hundreds of troops from Africa The plans, submitted by a top U.S. military commander, align with the Trump administration’s strategy to focus on near-peer threats from countries like China and Russia. By: Kyle Rempfer The African Union has a combined contribution of roughly 22,000 personnel in Somalia. By comparison, al Shabab has an estimated strength of 7,000 to 9,000 fighters, according to the Council on Foreign Relations. In early June, one U.S. soldier was killed and four more were wounded during an attack by al Shabab militants that consisted of small-arms fire and mortars. That attack occurred in southern Somalia’s Jubaland region. During that mission, the U.S. troops were working to “clear al-Shabab from contested areas, liberate villages from al-Shabab control, and establish a permanent combat outpost designed to increase the span of Federal Government of Somalia security and governance,” AFRICOM said in a statement after the soldier’s death. “U.S. forces will continue to use all authorized and appropriate measures to protect U.S. citizens and to disable terrorist threats," AFRICOM said in it’s latest statement. "This includes partnering with AMISOM and Somali National Security Forces in combined counterterrorism operations and targeting terrorists, their training camps, and their safe havens throughout Somalia and the region.” Al Shabab remains a serious threat for the Somali government, which has weak authority within the country and only regained control of Mogadishu in 2011. The group has been able to use Somalia as a haven from which they launch attacks on neighboring countries, such as Kenya and Uganda.